Trekking and Andalusia – By Keith

Sneaking an extra week of summer by a 6 day linear trek in Andalusia in the first week in November.
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View from Hotel in Ronda
6 folk, cheap flights to Malaga, transfer to Ardales, Walk 72 miles with a lot of ascent to Benarraba.
Light packs, staying in hostels and hotels in several pueblo blancos. Walking along parts of the GR249 (the round Andalusia 35 stage circuit)and the GR141. Good route finding and all made feasible by local guide Mike Newcomb at sierrawalks.com.
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Enter a caPassing by the Victorian Railway en route to Jimera de Libarption
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Crossing the R Turon
Mike designed the route, recommended and booked hotels, kept us informed of route issues and even booked some great local restaurants.
The route was varied—forest tracks, over mountains, down gorges, scrambling and across farmland and olive groves.
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Buitre (Vulture) Canyon en route to El Colmenar
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 Good signage for the GR249
And, weather, accommodation, food and wine all excellent. The local folk are incredibly friendly and helpful. Plus, it was quiet—we saw nobody else on the route.
Our only drawback was the very serious flooding which had occurred two weeks before.
It meant some route changes and actually having to abandon the last day as footbridges and parts of the trail had been washed out.
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Example of flood damage near Ronda
It was ever thus! As a mountain guide friend once said—“On the appropriate day to choose to drink coffee and eat cake is an essential part of mountaineering”!
A class trip—to be repeated as there is a lot to go at in Andalusia and most importantly it extends the summer!

Ailefroide Camp-a-rooney Pt 2 – by Ross

So….

Following on from our last adventure I’m just going to run through the final days I had in Camp-a-rooney.

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The Saturday was spent on a via ferrata with Derek and Wendy, but I have spoken of that already.

The Sunday, World Cup Final Day Alan and I went to explore some of the single pitch across the river. Everyone had tried some of the single pitch alongside the camp ground before I had arrived and had declared is ‘stiff for the grade’. This was much more amenable; short, rounded and balancey…basically grit routes with more bolts and less friction. We did 3-4 routes from 5 to 6b and they were OK, nothing great, just OK. The bolts were sensibly spaced, not run out but also not a clip ladder.

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We then had to head off to visit the patient. Funnily enough, driving in France while France were in the world cup final meant there was very little traffic. However on the return, Alan was finding it quite difficult. Driving someone else’s car, on the wrong side of the road with lots of people beeping their horns…. were they doing it in celebration or because he was doing something wrong. We plumped for the former and waved at lots of happy french people

That day Rob & Dec and James & Derek decided to do one of the most prominent lines that could be seen from the camp ground… Little Palavar (5c). 7 pitches and 3 abseils. They seemed to have fun.

Monday…. after a morning described as “Peak Faff” Kirsty Forder (2018) James, Rob, Alan and Dec headed back up the mountain to do Roche Paillon. I borrowed Derek’s bike and had a wonderful ride, with some questionable route finding and long climbs but pretty exciting single track type stuff. Definitely worth taking your bike with 3-4 marked trails with one using the lift system if wanted.

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2+ hours into peak faff

Tuesday, me and Derek headed for Snoopy (5c), 7 pitches which gave some really interesting and varied climbing, some slab, some layback, a bit of chimneying. Luckily Derek messed up  and missed the belay on pitch 4 meaning he got the awkward pitch requiring 1 bit of aid. Even with aid I would not have liked it…. he did really well.

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It was great to swing pitches having not climbed for most of the year and we gained height over the camp ground really quickly…seeing the valley from the other direction from Ecrins Total.

The ‘walk down’ was pretty iffy at times… not one to do in the rain or the dark!

Wednesday was my final day and I joined James and Derek on Cascades Bleu (6a), so named because you cross a waterfall (twice). I took the first pitch…and we swinged leads pretty much from then on with me and Derek leading 3 pitches each and James 2, though James did get the main cascade crossing. This route meandered more than snoopy with a couple of traversing pitches but was still a lovely route with excellent pitches.

I decided half way up that 3 belay plates between 3 climbers was extravagant and decided to dispense of mine somewhere…. which meant the abseil down was harder than it should be with Derek having to lower me down (sorry Derek). Some of the ledges had also eroded meaning very high anchor points and James managed to abseil below the path requiring a top roped scramble back up through the trees… but we made it unscathed and all thought it was a great route.

 

So my trip was over… and I was heading back on the train (well the first train turned into a 130km repalcement bus service) but it all went to plan. 8 days, 9 trains, 2 minibus shuttles and one replacement bus journey ….. all went to plan, mostly.

I think the general consensus was…. we need to plan 2019

 

 

Ailefroide Camp-a-rooney Pt 1 – by Ross

Despite some…well one major blip, I think the re-booted BuxtonMC Alps meet can be described as a roaring success. Between the group we ticked off alpine routes, higher altitude plodding, hut stays, multi-pitch and single pitch rock routes, mountain biking, via-ferrata, lower altitude walking and the traditional consummation of beer, wine and cheese.

What more could you want?

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There was a reconnaissance mission led by Dave and Jaimella, their write up can be found here. 

Ailefroide itself is a very small village… merely a few buildings. These building however include a newsagent, a very good gear shop, a Sherpa mini market, 3 pizza vans and various bars. These are all here to service the small town that is the campsite…. home to hundreds, maybe thousands of people but while we were there it never felt busy due to its vast size and varied camp grounds….. a home away from home.

The BuxtonMC members it attendance were;

  • Alison and Darryl
  • Derek and Wendy
  • Rob, Alan, Adrian and Dec (or Margot depending on what ID you check) 
  • James, Kirsty and kids
  • and finally me.

The number of people, plus the fact that within striking distance of the camp there were so many available activities means that a full write up on the 3 weeks that people were there is a Herculean task I am not willing to complete. Therefore I have created  a list of what was ticked until I left

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Via Ferrata

I did three Via Ferrata (Via Ferrati ?), the first 2 with Alison and Darryl and the 3rd with Derek. Non really resulted in the height gain that I have experienced in previous VF’s. Others got me into positions that as a mediocre climber I probably couldn’t have done climbing free.  Whereas the first and last this trip were up canyons/ravines with limited steep ground. The 2nd was up a face and the most consistently ‘up’ but again didn’t give the exposure I have come to associate with VF…. still entertaining though.

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Ecrins Totale

What seemed like a 25 min forced march could have been a leisurely 40 min stroll from the campsite but Derek and Rob seemed on a mission. Those two went to climb another route so I teamed up with Alan and then Dec with Adrian.

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The Mountain Men

It was a 6 pitch route which Derek assured us,  as it was the afternoon would pass into the shade imminently… therefore myself and Alan decided on the ‘big drink of water before setting off and don’t carry anything’ approach.

The first 2 pitches were fairly easy going, a nice introduction for me after a while off climbing. The 3rd pitch was much harder with a optional point of aid and then, what felt like quite a necky traverse. The 4th pitch was also committing and steep but was followed by a nice scrambley 5th. The 6th was a stiffer arete type pitch but with all you needed at the right time.

 

By the 4th pitch it was clear that Derek had misjudged the transit of the sun and we were still in full glare and parched to say the least. Derek then realised that when he was climbing in the shade 2 days ago with Alison…. it was a totally different climb and a totally different face! so on we battled to the abseil station with dry throats and dreams of iced water.

As most of you are already aware, the descent is a story in its own right, and a story for someone else to tell. Its fair to say though that it was a little while before I was going to be satiating my raging thirst with the bottled water at the foot of 3 abseils.

 

…..to be Continued

Steep Stoney By Steve

The club made a welcome return to Stoney Middleton on Tuesday. in recent years the Stoney meet has usually come with a ‘softer’ alternative of Froggatt or Burbage North… but this year it was an ‘all in’ approach. I think we had 12-14 people there sampling the delights of traditional peak Limestone.

Stoney Middleton comes with its own place in the history of Peak (and UK) climbing with the stories of Windy Ledge exploits by Whillans, Brown, Allen, Birtles, Proctor and later hard bouldering by Moon and Moffatt.  BuxtonMC would be following in their footsteps once again,  but maybe at a more leisurely pace… and with probably  less smoking.

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Simon above the Trees on Evasor

 

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Steve… how it used to be done (though previously more than 7″ above ground)

 

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David and James (hiding in the trees) on…something

 

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Alan and Matt finishing Padme

How Yellow Was My Valley… By Dan V

Our trip to the Emily Kelly Hut in North Wales was like a drop of pure, refreshing water in a vast desert.

As Britain baked in the harshest heatwave since the famed summer of ’76, a small band of merry mountaineers headed to the northern Welsh countryside. Despite weeks without rain and day after day of hot weather and cloudless skies, I packed my usual rain gear. After all, we were still in Britain. How long could this anomaly last? Another several weeks, as it turned out….

City of Gold!

In North Wales, gone were the usual grey skies, wind and rain. Gone were the usual lush green valleys and fields. The sky was cloudless and bright blue. The sun beat down and left nothing but burnt, yellow ground. The hut, usually a refuge from harsh weather, was instead a heat trap, the upstairs sauna-like upon our arrival. But who am I to complain? This was going to be a brilliant weekend.

Emma and Paul cycled on Saturday, enjoying a long tour through the hills and to the coast. Despite the burning sun and exhausting heat, the two cyclists were able to survive, buoyed by numerous ice cream and pizza stops. Paul also credited his survival to powerful sunglasses, so new, he didn’t even have time to take the label off! They returned sweaty, tired, brown, and oddly not hungry.

Emma and Ghost BikeGhost BikeSunglasses and Ice cream

Jo and William went on a long walk. I don’t know what they did or where they went, but I do know that William returned tired, but carrying a McDonald’s shake cup.

Robert and I took the most sensible approach in a heatwave, venturing out in the unrelenting sun and following the water pipeline up the steepest hill behind the hut. Two hours later we arrived at the foot of Lliwedd, our shirts and hats completely soaked through with sweat.

I had already drunk one litre of water. We climbed 10 pitches of enjoyable Welsh rock and then walked back. Our glory and feeling of triumph were only increased when we learned along the way that Belgium had defeated Brazil and France had beaten Uruguay to make an all-European World Cup. Take that South America!!! Also, apparently England did well. Or something.

classic climb

After the usual rounds of beer and white wine, which (exceptionally) we were able to enjoy outside in the warm evening, we managed to get to sleep. Sleeping bags seemed completely out of place, like umbrellas in the Sahara. A single sheet was all that protected me from the midges.

On Sunday most of us expected a quiet, relaxing day. We all started down toward the lake to relax. Instead we ended up plodding for some time through the heat, until we decided to wade back through the water. A boulder field on the route back served to justify our swim, as if it was instead a minefield, and only Robert had the ability to cross it. I expected we would just go in up to our knees or so. How naive I was. The lake quickly drops off from ankle deep to chest deep. Soon, we were all swimming, fully clothed, packs on backs, along the coast and through clouds of marijuana smoke, people on kayaks, and birds protecting their nests. Luckily at the last minute before going in, we had realised that wallets and phones do not dry out as well as other things, so Robert saved the day by taking these and walking back over the scary boulder field.

Buxton Swimmaneering CLub 1

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We thought we had seen Britain at its yellowest, but the heatwave continued for weeks after our trip. The Buxton Swimmaneering Club may yet return to swim again. 

Stanage , Manchester Buttress

Tuesday 24th July saw the club heading to Stanage again, this time to Manchester Buttress area at Popular end. With 4 members still in France we still managed a good turnout to climbing and  had 4 in the walking group.

As would be expected Derek (fresh from the Ecrins granite), Chris, Brid, David, Ann and Simon all managed to climb Manchester Buttress. All doing the traverse in slightly different fashions

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Anne seconding Manchester Buttress

 

Anatomy and Physiology were all pretty popular as was Black Hawk Hell Crack

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Chris on Black Hawk Hell Crack (S4a)
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Jo on Black Hawk Hell Crack (S4a)

Tim climbed both Gargoyle Buttress (VS 4b) and Lancashire Wall (HVS-) but unfortunately I was belaying both of those so no photographic evidence. Simon on the other hand went for Gargoyle variant (HS 4b) and Tinkers Crack (VS 4c).

 

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Gemma taking her own path while seconding Simon on Tinkers Crack. David on Physiology

David led Black Hawk Traverse Left (VD) while Jo led the tricky Black Hawk (HS 4c) seconded by William and Stuart,

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Jo getting acquainted with the underside of the flake

First time attendee Kate managed to second 2-3 routes, enjoying a late night of freedom while child free. Hopefully she will return….she couldn’t have got a better introduction than a warm, midge free evening at a fairly deserted Stanage.

Karl, Steve and Dan headed off right to do some routes in that direction and Hattie got bored and took herself off to to see what was happening in the carpark.

 

The walking group of the Alps fit, Wendy, Daryl and Alison… plus Andy  set out from Hook’s car Car Park and enjoyed a short scramble up a descent route somewhere north of Robin Hood’s Balcony before heading south to inspect the climbers. They then visited Burbage North and Higgar Tor before returning to Stanage.

Andy Walk