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If you don’t go, You don’t know….. By James

After 3 nights skiing – I couldn’t find Kirsten’s Wall of Death, more details please Adrian. I went searching for weekend partners. A barrage of excuses followed (its my birthday so I can’t come out – feeble!) but fortunately Stu was keen.
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A leisurely 9 am start at Barber Booth and we were heading up Crowden Clough. It didn’t look good. But low and behold a short ice pitch right at the very top was our reward.
We decided to head across the plateau to the Downfall just to put our minds at rest and confirm it wasn’t frozen before heading over to our back up plan.
Well we head a pleasant surprise when we got there, certainly complete and no other climbers. A quick sandwich and we were gearing up at the base.
After that it was simply pure joy straight up an icy staircase to the icicle, a not big enough sling runner, then traverse on good ice and some ball bearings and up the chimney corner to finish, a long held dream realised.
We walked back in the fading twilight. Bum slides down a snow covered Jacob’s Ladder are a lot better than the summer slog. A super day, super route, super company.
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P.S. A cold sunny Saturday afternoon with no other climbers about is definitely a better time to make an attempt than queuing for hours in the middle of a mild Thursday night when most of the first half of the route has already fallen down.
Photos by Stuart

Four go biking in the snow (plus Rob squeezes enough wee out to be useful – no honestly read on!)

On the last day of really good snow conditions in the Buxton area (before the Atlantic mild conditions swept in overnight).

It was cold but gloriously sunny when we set off from Buxton at 10.45. Cycling to Harper Hill on clear roads, we then soon went off road on the fairly new bridleway that goes up to Staker Hill. This was snowy under wheel from the start and consistently uphill, on the steeper sections the snow became deep enough to stop progress. Just what we wanted!

We arrived nearly at the crest of the hill when my freehub ceased to function, the pedals going round, but no engagement with the drivetrain. After banging the back wheel on the ground hard a few times, which did no good, we stood around for a bit going through the various options. Emma Jo had heard that in these cold conditions, if you urinate on the freehub the warmth could possibly get it working again. Well, I thought, “I don’t want anyone pissing on my bike”, but after a few more attempts, I gave up knocking the back wheel.

We stood around for a few minutes, Derek and I looked at each other and shrugged, no desire to urinate from either of us. Rob said that he might be able to squeeze a bit out. He shyly performed said operation and by a small miracle, it worked!

Quick, back on the bike and pedal over the snow like fury – thankfully we weren’t troubled by mechanical problems again. In absolutely glorious sunshine and, in places deep, firm (but not too hard) snow, we made off road progress. This is not to say that it was fast going , with much sliding, laughing and the occasional fall in the lovely snow. Did I mention the views, a blanket of shiny white over Axe Edge, Chrome Hill and beyond. It was better than we could have hoped for, so many photos were taken.

Our route took us over the hills off-road to the bridleway above Hindlow quarry (tricky uphill progress in snowy ruts), then a wonderful flowing descent to Earl Sterndale. Up and over past High Wheeldon, we crossed the A515 just north of Pomeroy and had to go past John and Jean Rout’s isolated and lovely house, so we popped in for a cuppa. It was very nice to see them and catch up, and the chocolate biscuits were great too. The selfie sums up the mood, although I wasn’t aware when I took the selfie that there was the spiky leaf of a plant in front of the lens. Never mind, we’ll edit that out later (doh!).

The icicles on their shed were truly spectacular. It was very difficult to leave the warmth and comfort though to get back on our bikes, but daylight hours are quite short at this time of year.

Straight onto the Pennine bridleway and snowy back roads to Taddington. Then the slippy and slidey Priestcliffe descent down to Millers Dale – loads of fun.Due to the pressure of time we decided to just head back to Buxton the quickest way (Monsal trail and A6), arriving home just as the rain started.

PS – The next day I cycled in the same area with Neil Pitts, who happened to be visiting the area, and the snow had virtually all gone!

Tales of Distant Times and Distant Places

With an excellent turn out, the club’s first winter slideshow on Tuesday night (15th) showcased the wide breadth and diversity of the club’s activities with presentations on:

– Climbing Mont Blanc and walking and bivvying in the Chamonix mountains, prior to the Club’s upcoming summer trip to Argentiere.

– Classic cragging in Saxony and mountaineering in the Alps.

– Club outings in the Peaks during the ‘Beast from the East’, N Wales and  superb November sunshine in the Lakes.

– Summer trip to Alaska and Denali.

-And, storm chasing through the US mid-West.

Plus arrangements as to winter Tuesday night indoor climbing, Burns night supper and the walk the Peak Boundary project!

Trekking and Andalusia – By Keith

Sneaking an extra week of summer by a 6 day linear trek in Andalusia in the first week in November.
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View from Hotel in Ronda
6 folk, cheap flights to Malaga, transfer to Ardales, Walk 72 miles with a lot of ascent to Benarraba.
Light packs, staying in hostels and hotels in several pueblo blancos. Walking along parts of the GR249 (the round Andalusia 35 stage circuit)and the GR141. Good route finding and all made feasible by local guide Mike Newcomb at sierrawalks.com.
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Enter a caPassing by the Victorian Railway en route to Jimera de Libarption
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Crossing the R Turon
Mike designed the route, recommended and booked hotels, kept us informed of route issues and even booked some great local restaurants.
The route was varied—forest tracks, over mountains, down gorges, scrambling and across farmland and olive groves.
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Buitre (Vulture) Canyon en route to El Colmenar
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 Good signage for the GR249
And, weather, accommodation, food and wine all excellent. The local folk are incredibly friendly and helpful. Plus, it was quiet—we saw nobody else on the route.
Our only drawback was the very serious flooding which had occurred two weeks before.
It meant some route changes and actually having to abandon the last day as footbridges and parts of the trail had been washed out.
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Example of flood damage near Ronda
It was ever thus! As a mountain guide friend once said—“On the appropriate day to choose to drink coffee and eat cake is an essential part of mountaineering”!
A class trip—to be repeated as there is a lot to go at in Andalusia and most importantly it extends the summer!

Ailefroide Camp-a-rooney Pt 2 – by Ross

So….

Following on from our last adventure I’m just going to run through the final days I had in Camp-a-rooney.

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The Saturday was spent on a via ferrata with Derek and Wendy, but I have spoken of that already.

The Sunday, World Cup Final Day Alan and I went to explore some of the single pitch across the river. Everyone had tried some of the single pitch alongside the camp ground before I had arrived and had declared is ‘stiff for the grade’. This was much more amenable; short, rounded and balancey…basically grit routes with more bolts and less friction. We did 3-4 routes from 5 to 6b and they were OK, nothing great, just OK. The bolts were sensibly spaced, not run out but also not a clip ladder.

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We then had to head off to visit the patient. Funnily enough, driving in France while France were in the world cup final meant there was very little traffic. However on the return, Alan was finding it quite difficult. Driving someone else’s car, on the wrong side of the road with lots of people beeping their horns…. were they doing it in celebration or because he was doing something wrong. We plumped for the former and waved at lots of happy french people

That day Rob & Dec and James & Derek decided to do one of the most prominent lines that could be seen from the camp ground… Little Palavar (5c). 7 pitches and 3 abseils. They seemed to have fun.

Monday…. after a morning described as “Peak Faff” Kirsty Forder (2018) James, Rob, Alan and Dec headed back up the mountain to do Roche Paillon. I borrowed Derek’s bike and had a wonderful ride, with some questionable route finding and long climbs but pretty exciting single track type stuff. Definitely worth taking your bike with 3-4 marked trails with one using the lift system if wanted.

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2+ hours into peak faff

Tuesday, me and Derek headed for Snoopy (5c), 7 pitches which gave some really interesting and varied climbing, some slab, some layback, a bit of chimneying. Luckily Derek messed up  and missed the belay on pitch 4 meaning he got the awkward pitch requiring 1 bit of aid. Even with aid I would not have liked it…. he did really well.

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It was great to swing pitches having not climbed for most of the year and we gained height over the camp ground really quickly…seeing the valley from the other direction from Ecrins Total.

The ‘walk down’ was pretty iffy at times… not one to do in the rain or the dark!

Wednesday was my final day and I joined James and Derek on Cascades Bleu (6a), so named because you cross a waterfall (twice). I took the first pitch…and we swinged leads pretty much from then on with me and Derek leading 3 pitches each and James 2, though James did get the main cascade crossing. This route meandered more than snoopy with a couple of traversing pitches but was still a lovely route with excellent pitches.

I decided half way up that 3 belay plates between 3 climbers was extravagant and decided to dispense of mine somewhere…. which meant the abseil down was harder than it should be with Derek having to lower me down (sorry Derek). Some of the ledges had also eroded meaning very high anchor points and James managed to abseil below the path requiring a top roped scramble back up through the trees… but we made it unscathed and all thought it was a great route.

 

So my trip was over… and I was heading back on the train (well the first train turned into a 130km repalcement bus service) but it all went to plan. 8 days, 9 trains, 2 minibus shuttles and one replacement bus journey ….. all went to plan, mostly.

I think the general consensus was…. we need to plan 2019